I have been working alongside Alison Green on her new project for job seekers, and today she is giving away a free guide on how job seekers can do a job interview well. The guide has some great tips in there that I’ve never even considered, and I’ve already told her it will be going in my job search toolbox for the next time I have a job interview. :-) If reading’s not your thing, she has also created a twenty minute video (also free!) to give you the information you’re looking for.

Click here to get the free guide on how to prepare for a job interview

I can’t guarantee that you’ll get a job if you use this guide, but I darn well know that you can do better in the interview than you ever have before! Continue reading

the biggest job seeker frustrationI’ve been watching the results come in from a survey that Alison Green is working on, and I’m kind of ashamed to see the final result. What are job seekers frustrated about?

The biggie (49%!) is lack of communication. The second most common (11%) is having standards that are unreasonably exact, which keeps candidates and hiring managers frustrated.

Fixing the broken recruiting process Continue reading

I’ve been chatting behind the scenes with HR professionals both locally and nationwide. Many of them are out of work and looking for the next gig to open up. I can give them advice until my face turns blue, but I’ve had a grand total of one HR position. Much of what I know is how to market yourself via social media and how to take advantage of the multiple tools out there to help yourself be found if someone wants to learn more about you as a candidate. But I know that I still have a lot to learn, and I was wondering if anyone out there would like to give some encouragement or advice to those who are currently out of work and looking for their next position.

How did you get your job? Did you use a personal connection, or was it just a random resume copy that fell into the right hands?

If you happen to be one of those looking for a job, there are some great sites out there that can give you a leg up on your job search. And finding local HR jobs isn’t as hard as it once was. Plus, it’s easier than ever to find helpful career advice, because most of us don’t spend the majority of our time preparing to look for a new job. Whatever your employment status, keep those who are out of work in your thoughts. It’s a tough path to walk.

Photo by rick.

I frequented the multitude of career blogs when I was job hunting, and while I could find dozens of posts on how to get a job, I really didn\’t see anything that helped with how to leave a job. What\’s okay and what\’s not? Is it a problem if I email some people and not others? Should we have a going-away party or celebration? And that\’s just what I can pull from the top of my head. I\’m willing to bet that many of you have experienced the same questions when you want to leave your job and don\’t know the “how” that is involved. Don\’t worry, though, I\’ve found something that is going to help. It’s “The Exit Guide” from Jobacle.

Before I created UpstartHR, I wrote for a career site called Jobacle. I developed a great relationship with Andrew, the owner, and we still chat pretty often. When I found out that he was releasing a guide on how to leave your job, I knew it was something I needed to share.

Jobacle is a blog written by the worker, for the worker, and it\’s just one part of the Jobacle brand. In addition to the 5+ years of articles and posts on the blog, Andrew has also build a library of dozens of career podcasts that are completely free for the taking. In other words, he has proven himself to be a trustworthy source for thousands of job seekers over the years. Now he has developed his first guide, and I couldn\’t be happier for him.

If you\’d like to get your own copy of “The Exit Guide,” just click the link and see for yourself what he has put together to help you with how to leave your job. I think you\’ll be thrilled with the result!