This post brought to you by National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation . The content and opinions expressed below are that of upstartHR.

Over the past few months we have discussed restaurant skills and the impact they can have on someone’s long-term career options. We have also covered some amazing topics within the restaurant industry, and I hope you have learned as much as I have about the variety of career opportunities available. Today we are going to take a slightly more scientific look at those skills, but stick with me, because this is great information.

 Food and Beverage Service Competency Model

If you’re not aware, a competency model is a tool that defines the key KSA’s (knowledge, skills, and abilities) required to perform a job successfully. The rest of this post is built on that foundation, so it’s important that you understand the relevance of that. Competency models are powerful things, because we can use them to hire, train, and manage employees with a purpose and a plan (instead of merely guessing at the restaurant skills our staff need).

The National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) developed the Food and Beverage Service Competency Model, a model geared specifically toward the restaurant industry. Now, if you’re anything like me, you probably had an initial thought of “Seriously? How complex can it be?” Don’t worry, it can be as complex or as simple as you’d like, depending on the career level/position you’re targeting. Check it out: Continue reading

This post brought to you by National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation . The content and opinions expressed below are that of upstartHR.

So far we’ve seen data on career mobility, the power of commitment, and competitive compensation offered by the restaurant industry. Today we’re going to look at another intangible, but incredibly powerful, aspect of the employment relationship–pride.

A few facts:

  • 92% of restaurant managers, 94% of business operations professionals, 92% of chefs and cooks, 80% of bartenders, 85% of hosts and hostesses and 75% of waitstaff, crew and dishwashers are proud to work in the restaurant industry,
  • In a survey of teenagers (under 18) in the restaurant industry, 78% are proud to work in the industry, 89% are enrolled in school and 41% work fewer than 20 hours per week.
  • More than 90% of restaurant employees ages 35-64 are proud to work in the industry and roughly 40% work at least 59 hours per week.

I can’t attest to the statistical significance, but the more time someone spends in the industry, the more pride they have in the kind of work they do. That aligns to more than just this specific type of career choice, but it’s something worth remembering. And those at the beginning of the “funnel” career-wise are just getting warmed up–that provides an opportunity to really engage them and leverage that pride.

I think some of us can easily fall into the stereotype at times that someone working in the restaurant industry is taking a “lesser” job. That’s certainly not true, especially based on what we see in the data here. This is a vibrant field with opportunities for long-term advancement and growth, and the employees are proud to be doing the work.

Check out the infographic below titled “A Career in Restaurants and Proud of It” from the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation.

Infographic-8

What is your favorite statistic from the infographic?

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This post brought to you by National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation . The content and opinions expressed below are that of upstartHR.

This post continues our overarching discussion of the importance of restaurant careers and the opportunities available within the industry. Today the focus will be on the mobility of those employed within the field. Here are a couple key statistics from the infographic below:

  • 9 in 10 restaurant workers 35 or older have moved to higher-paying jobs in the industry after their first job.
  • Even newbies enjoy the restaurant industry’s upward mobility: 71% of employees 18-24 land a more lucrative gig in the business after their first job.
  • The abundance of restaurants in nearly every community presents opportunities and experience to land other positions.

Continue reading

This post brought to you by 3M. The content and opinions expressed below are that of upstartHR.

When you work in HR, you have access to a substantial amount of sensitive business data. It’s just the nature of what we do. But technology is continuously improving to help keep our data safe, and I want to talk about one new option that is making that possible.

In the age of cybersecurity, hackers, data breaches, and other web-based threats, it’s easy to forget that the simplest security lapses often involve a human element. Continue reading

This post brought to you by National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation . The content and opinions expressed below are that of upstartHR.

Over the past few weeks as we have explored various areas of the restaurant industry, including career opportunities, compensation, and more. Today I want to direct your attention to the power of the industry both in providing initial job opportunities as well as long-term prospects. Here are a few of the key statistics from the infographic below:

  • The restaurant industry provides a great start for younger workers. 92% of restaurant employees younger than 18 say their first job was in the restaurant industry.
  • Many of these employees stay in the industry for a long time. Restaurant employees ages 25- to 34-years old have a median tenure of 10 years in the industry, while employees ages 35-to-44-years have a median tenure of 19 years.
  • Many who venture out of the industry return: 60% of restaurant industry employees 35 and older have returned to the industry after stints in other fields.
  • This is an industry that allows employees time to pursue higher education. 64% of bartenders, 49% of restaurant managers and 41% of servers are currently attending a four-year college or university.

Continue reading

This post brought to you by National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation . The content and opinions expressed below are that of upstartHR.

Over the past few weeks we have looked at competitive compensationcareer paths, and work skills as they relate to careers in the restaurant field.

Today the focus will be on the value of a long term commitment to a career within the restaurant industry. Check out a few of the facts:

  • Lifelong careers in the restaurant industry are not uncommon. 70% of restaurant employees plan to stay in industry until they retire.
  • This is shown in the fact that the median tenure of restaurant management and business operations employees is 20 years in the industry.
  • A job in the restaurant industry pays off: 71% of salaried restaurant managers, 50% of salaried shift/crew supervisors and 47% of salaried chefs/cooks earned a bonus in the past year.

In a time when many are worried about long term job stability, I think it’s a powerful testament to the long term value of these professions for 7 out of 10 employees to want to remain in the industry until retirement.

In addition, when many corporate employees are facing limited (if any) bonuses, the fact that 47-71% of restaurant employees received some bonus in recognition of their efforts is pretty astounding. The one that most stuck out from my point of view is the manager group receiving more bonuses than other staff–that’s yet another inspiration for the other employees to aspire to a higher level of leadership.

In the infograpic below titled “Dedication Pays Off,” you can see these and other statistics that prove the long term value of a career within the restaurant field.

Which one is most impactful for you?

Dedication Pays Off

 

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This post brought to you by National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation . The content and opinions expressed below are that of upstartHR.

As we continue the discussion about the restaurant industry, we’ve seen some great content as far as jobs and career tracks. One of the first things people consider when looking at career options is the compensation. A few of the more common questions:

What will I make? Can I provide for my family? What about growth of pay over time?

As you can tell from the information below, the responses to those questions are definitely positive. The infographic below looks at some key areas around these questions, but the following points are especially pertinent:
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  • The numbers are clear – there are very competitive wages available to employees of the restaurant industry. Chefs and cooks make a median base salary of $50,000, while restaurant managers make a median base salary of $47,000.
  • Salaries in the industry are not stagnant. Entry-level employees receive a pay raise, on average, within six months of hire. About 70% of managers and shift/crew supervisors have received a raise within the past year.
  • The industry goes beyond hourly pay; by mid-career, 57% of restaurant employees are salaried.

One of the stats that I’m particularly surprised by is the growth of wages over time, particularly the 70% figure for managers and supervisors. That is a prime example of the type of growth and opportunity available within the industry that might otherwise not be obvious to those unfamiliar with the restaurant field.

In the infographic titled “Do The Math” you can find some of the key areas that people want to learn about regarding restaurant career compensation.

 photo NRAEFINFORGRAPHIC4copy_zps6cc67976.jpg

So, what are your thoughts regarding compensation in the restaurant industry? Did anything in here surprise you?

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