Category Archives: General

How Do I Support a Remote Work Culture? A Q&A Episode on We’re Only Human

“My company is going remote because of COVID. How do I transition our culture over?” 

We’re Only Human — Episode 97

In today’s episode, Ben takes three audience questions: 

  • How do we move to a remote work culture?
  • What payroll technology works for a smaller organization? 
  • How do I leave a toxic workplace? 

We are trying out this Q&A series and would love to hear your feedback! Let us know if you enjoy it or if you want to ask your own question. Just send it to questions@upstarthr.com or record a short voice question anonymously at https://upstarthr.com/question

Quote for today’s episode by Kahlil Gibran: 

Work is love made visible. And if you cannot work with love but only with distaste, it is better that you should leave your work and sit at the gate of the temple and take alms of those who work with joy. For if you bake bread with indifference, you bake a bitter bread that feeds but half man’s hunger. And if you grudge the crushing of the grapes, your grudge distils a poison in the wine. And if you sing though as angels, and love not the singing, you muffle man’s ears to the voices of the day and the voices of the night.

How Takeda Radically Transformed Its HR Operating Model on We’re Only Human

“I think you can’t make the mistake of designing an optimal, or academically perfect HR operating model in a vacuum. It really must be aligned with your fundamental business strategy and the overall operating model.” Lauren Duprey, Takeda Pharmaceuticals

 

This is the first in a fascinating new series of episodes where we interview talent and HR leaders from a select set of IBM Talent and Transformation clients about their innovative practices and approaches. 

 

We’re Only Human — Episode 96

 

What does it take to change the fundamental model for how HR operates in a business? In the case of Takeda, it took considerable time to settle on an approach that balanced global governance and accountability with localized, agile decision-making. The rollout of this HR transformation began in February of 2020.

Yes, right as COVID was beginning to hit.

Some would say that’s the worst time, but in hindsight it might have also turned out to be the best. In the turmoil that followed globally, Takeda’s HR team was set up to respond to business needs, adapt to change, and deliver service in a tailored and agile manner. 

In today’s discussion, Ben talks with Lauren Duprey and Dominique Brewer about the firm’s shift in operating models, deep focus on equity and inclusion, and more. This session is a master class on how to design an HR model that enables the talent team to support the critical objectives of the business. 

 

To learn more about IBM Talent Transformation Services:
http://ibm.biz/talentacquisition

To see the work Takeda is doing and understand more about the firm, visit takedajobs.com

HRCI Changes Requirements for PHR, SPHR Recertification Starting 2021

Every so often HRCI, the Human Resources Certification Institute, changes the requirements for its exams. For instance, in 2018 the exam body of knowledge changed the most it had since I got my PHR back in 2009.

I have written extensively about how the recertification process works (and how it doesn’t), which exams are a better fit for you, and more. We also have inexpensive courses designed to supplement the dry and often boring textbooks out there if you are planning to get your PHR or SPHR.

In the summer of 2020, the exam recertification process saw a new change for those with an aPHR, PHR, SPHR, GPHR, California, or International certifications as the chart below demonstrates.

HR Ethics Credit Hour Requirements

New HR Certification Ethics Requirement

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upskilling imperative book

Why Learning is the Superpower We All Need: The Upskilling Imperative on We’re Only Human

“And to me, just hands down learning is the future of work. Let’s just put a period on that. That’s how I feel about this.  We’ve entered this era of where there’s continuous, rapid change. It just keeps coming for us. Every day we’re faced with a new change. And the only way that we can sort of ride those changes or rise to them is through continuous learning.” Shelley Osborne

We’re Only Human – Episode 95

If that statement doesn’t convey the sentiment of this episode, nothing will. In this discussion with Shelley Osborne, the conversation explores key points and ideas from The Upskilling Imperative, Shelley’s new book.

Ben and Shelley dig into why we learn the way we do, what it takes to shake up corporate learning practices, and how to drive better outcomes with manager involvement, feedback, and so much more.

Want to get the book? Check it out here: https://amzn.to/3iG8o55

Your Brain on Change Management-Google’s Travis Hahler on We’re Only Human

“One of the things that I find most fascinating about using neuroscience in the [change management] work that I do is that there’s a lot of really common misconceptions about neuroscience.” Travis Hahler, Google

We’re Only Human – Episode 94

What is neuroscience and why should we be thinking about it as HR and business leaders? Neuroscience is the study of how the brain works, how we make decisions, and what drives our behaviors. 

If we can understand some of the underlying evidence and contributing factors, we can change behaviors of the people we work with. It sounds easier than it is, but using neuroscience principles to guide these changes can lead to powerful outcomes. In today’s discussion, Travis Hahler from Google talks with Ben about some of the elements of brain science that fit into change management and behavior modification. 

This interview was recorded during the first ever virtual reality conference for HR leaders, the Global HR Summit, in September 2020. 

Connect with Travis on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/travisdhahler/

stressing over events

How to Run Virtual HR Events, Find Sponsors, and More: A Guide for Volunteer Leaders

Note: today’s post is geared towards volunteer leaders at SHRM chapters, ATD groups, HR state councils, event planners, and other membership organizations and associations serving fthe HR/talent professional. If that’s not you, then feel free to:

  1. Share with your own local chapter and/or
  2. Go on your merry way and offer a kind word or compliment to the next three people you talk to. Enjoy!

If you are a president, certification director, or programs leader for a professional chapter, you have had a wild year. Live events are canceling or pushing off indefinitely, and for many local groups, even the thought of something virtual can feel like unprecedented territory.

stressing over eventsAs a speaker, event host, and event producer, I know the feeling! :-) Today I’ll share some ideas about what has worked for me if you have a more “do it yourself” approach. I’ll also offer an option if you’d like me to help with your event (note: I’ve programmed or planned over 100 live events in the last 10 years and probably that many virtual or digital sessions this year alone).

Bottom line: you got this! Let’s dive into some of the things that are changing.

The Do It Yourself Approach for Online HR Events

The biggest perceived hurdle when it comes to online events is the delivery. How do we get content that has traditionally been delivered on a stage to our audience? The answer is technology. 2020 will go down as the year that Zoom became a term that everyone over the age of five years old understands, but is Zoom right for your event?

Zoom can be used for smaller meetings, and you can pay for Zoom webinars (a better and more intuitive version of GoToWebinar and some of the other older solutions in that space), but today’s environment is driving attendees to want to be more engaged and participatory in events.

Livestreaming

Many events are now looking at livestreaming. You can easily livestream to a chapter Facebook page or a YouTube channel, for example, and you don’t have to pay extra if you have 10 viewers or 1,000 like you would with most webinar software. You also get the social aspect woven in: attendees can see who else is there, chat with each other, and more. I have found this to be very powerful for creating connections with the audience.

I use StreamYard for streaming and it has been very valuable as a tool. It’s inexpensive, and all of your sessions are archived after you finish broadcasting. You could even use Streamyard to host panel discussions if you prefer that style to a more traditional keynote. Note: the StreamYard link above will give you a $10 coupon if you sign up!

Virtual Event Platforms

Event apps like Whova are also becoming more important. A new event app just got millions of dollars in venture capital funding because it has seen the space explode in popularity recently. These types of apps allow event organizers to host virtual sessions, offer expo areas for sponsors, and allow attendees to register and engage with the other participants during the sessions. This is more expensive and may be better suited for a virtual conference rather than monthly or quarterly educational sessions. Note: the Whova link above will get you a $100 coupon if you sign up!

Archiving and Selling Your Content

If you want to archive the content and offer it for payment after the fact, an idea that is new to many HR chapters and may lead to long-term revenue for supporting chapter programming, community donations, and other needs, you need a system to hold the content after it’s been recorded.

Two of the leading players in that space are Thinkific and Podia. In about 10 minutes, you can add a recorded video, set up your pricing, and have a link available for people to purchase the recorded session. The best part? You don’t have to touch it again!

Plus, in Thinkific, you can even set the content so people can’t fast forward through it, then have the certification codes from HRCI/SHRM at the end of the session for attendees to submit for credits. I have had some people try to cheat and skip the content, and this prevents that from happening.

Rethinking Content for Virtual HR Events

A few things on content when it comes to virtual events:

  • New research from Microsoft shows our attention span starts to dip at 40 minutes on a video call. If you can add a layer of interactivity, that can help to boost attention and interest.
  • More engaging/dynamic conversations, such as panel discussions, can help to add a layer of excitement that could be harder to get with a single speaker.
  • Individual speakers can get away with being a bit sluggish in person, but it becomes almost painful in a virtual setting. Find someone that conveys emotion, excitement, and passion with their words and body language.

Sponsors, Payments, and Speaking Fees

Sponsors: sponsors STILL want to get in front of your audience. They still want to support your programs. But they need to know that it’s worth the investment. Coming up with some creative packages and approaches for sponsors to drive interest and engagement is critical here. There are a few key things sponsors want:

  • Leads and connections: they want to sell. Period.
  • Thought leadership and exposure: they want to be seen as experts for your audience.

Finding new and creative ways to give them those things, as I have done with many of the events I’ve planned this year, can lead to great outcomes for your events and for the sponsors helping to make them happen.

Speakers: you should expect to pay many professional speakers for their appearance on a virtual session as well. I have personally done about 20 free events this year as a way to give back while the community is hurting, but I also speak as a way to feed my family. Virtual events still require a great delivery (maybe even a better delivery, based on what I shared above), amazing content, and a deep connection with your audience. For events I am participating in, I’m seeing about 30-40% of normal speaker fees being paid for keynotes right now.

Silver lining: you might get a speaker your chapter could never afford in person!

Pricing: on the pricing front, YES you can charge people for virtual events. The bigger/longer they are (conference, full day workshop) the more you can charge them. If it’s shorter, you may decide to offer some content for free or reduced prices.

And remember, if you’re recording all of the virtual events you are doing, you have the option of putting it up on a site like Podia and have the replay on sale indefinitely. Your audience can pay anywhere from $9 to $99 (or more) depending on the length, the number of credits, and the demand for the topic. I’ll repeat that: your audience will keep buying it as long as it continues to be relevant.

Most chapters only make money when they run a live event or host a membership drive, but this kind of ongoing revenue stream can be very valuable for smoothing out the feast or famine budgets of some chapters, allowing you to serve your community in better ways.

Getting Some Help for Your Virtual HR Events

If you have read this and you feel like your head may explode, don’t worry! I am working with a partner on several events across the United States from the planning to the content to the production and everything in between. If you’d like help with any of the following, just reach out:

  • Planning compelling, relevant content for your virtual HR event
  • Deciding how to get sponsors interested in your virtual event
  • Making a profit on a virtual event that rivals your profit on an in-person event (with much less risk!)

Bottom line, the world is a different place, at least for the time being. I hope this helps you think through some of the nuances of virtual events and gives you some ideas on how to make yours amazing. Keep serving the HR community–they need you!

Groundbreaking Research on Organizational Agility with Oracle on We’re Only Human

“What we’re telling customers is that we can help make work more human. First is really putting empathy at the forefront of the employee experience. It’s up to HR to work with leadership and create this human experience.” Munjal Munshi, Oracle

 

We’re Only Human – Episode 93

Organizational agility is a critical part of adapting to and overcoming change. What does this mean in the context of the work HR does? 

Everything

Our newest data at Lighthouse Research & Advisory show that 96% of employers that claim to be future-ready also say that their HR technology plays a critical role in enabling that agility at an organizational level. In today’s discussion, Ben talks with Munjal Munshi of Oracle to discuss the concept of organizational agility, how HR technology plays a role in that, and the practical lessons and ideas for today’s business leaders.

One critical part of the talk? How HR and IT can work more closely together to create better relationships and better outcomes. 

Check out the free research report: http://oracle.com/goto/lighthouse