How Does AlliedUniversal Hire 90,000 Workers a Year? Referrals and PURPOSE [Podcast]

How many people did your firm hire last year? 10? 100? 1,000? While it’s not a contest, there are lessons to be learned from organizations that hire more people, because they have the process down to a science. Today we’re going to hear from the head of hiring operations at AlliedUniversal, one of the largest security firms in the world. AlliedUniversal hires more than 90,000 workers per year and has some great lessons we can all learn from, such as hiring with purpose.

I actually looked at the archive and realized I recorded a video nearly 8 years ago on how to work with purpose. It’s pretty early in my video recording days, which means the quality is iffy and you get to see the version of me that was brand new to this whole world of HR, but if you want to subject yourself to it, here’s the link. :-)

Subscribers click through to listen to the show below Continue reading

mastering metrics and change management

Mini Virtual HR Conference: HR Metrics and Change Management (2 Free Business Credits)

In the last few weeks I’ve had the pleasure of visiting Toronto and the Caribbean to speak about metrics, evidence, and leading change. It’s been wonderful to speak to hundreds of HR pros between the two events, but I also realize that many of you are looking for quality content and conversations to improve your own HR service delivery.

mastering metrics and change managementWith that in mind, I’m going to run a mini virtual HR conference at 11am Central time on February 20th and 21st. Here’s the schedule:

  • Tuesday, March 6th Metrics: Measuring HR’s Business Value
  • Wednesday, Marcy 7th Driving Change: How HR Can Lead Effective Change Management Practices

These sessions have been previously approved for business credits from HRCI and general professional development credits from SHRM.

If you’re interested in attending, you can register below or on our registration page:

Register for the event


Session Descriptions

Session 1: Metrics: Measuring HR’s Business Value

“If it can’t be measured, don’t do it.” This quote from a conversation with a CEO of a global enterprise has a powerful ring to it — but do we really have the ability to measure everything that we do in the business? This session is designed to help HR leaders understand how to create a measurement mindset that looks first to data to help solve organizational problems. Explore examples of balanced scorecards and unique metrics created to align with business objectives, as well as case studies of metrics in action. Find out how to develop an evidence-based approach to solving business problems.

Session 2: Leading Change: How HR Can Lead Effective Change Management Practices

Change, funny enough, is unchanging. Every day there are new challenges and opportunities, but are our organizations ready for this pace? In this lively session, Ben Eubanks will examine the increasing pace of change for the business world and what it means for those tasked with internal change management practices. Are the old methods still enough, or do we need a new model? In addition, we’ll explore principles of influence, such as building alliances, considering stakeholder inputs, and more. The session will include case studies of companies that have successfully (and unsuccessfully) faced change head-on and the lessons found within.

Register for the event


FYI: This workshop has previously been pre-approved for 3 hours of business credits with HRCI (3 SHRM PDC’s). Contact me for details if you’re interested in having this session delivered to your local SHRM chapter or HR group, 

If you missed seeing me these last few weeks on the road, I’d love to have you join me!

battle hr recertification credits

The Hidden Battle for SHRM and HRCI Recertification Credits

Today I’m going to talk openly and honestly about SHRM, HRCI, and things that matter to today’s HR professionals. I have my SHRM-SCP and my SPHR, and I expect to keep them both for the foreseeable future. I think both have merit as of today (February 2018). But maybe that is going to change…

Newsflash: if you get certified as an HR professional, you need recertification (or “recert”) credits to keep your certification (unless you want to take the test again every three years!) As a chapter leader AND a speaker, I see the other side of the equation that most HR practitioners do not. I have to submit my content for credits, and I also have to work with my chapter to submit our content as well to get the appropriate credits.

battle hr recertification creditsOver the years, HRCI has become increasingly stubborn and challenging about awarding SPHR-required business credits for sessions. After several failed attempts in 2016 to get credits awarded for our chapter (for sessions like “building a strategic hiring plan for your organization” and “evaluating the ROI of training initiatives,” we actually ran into an even BIGGER problem. We received business credits, promoted it with business credits to our members, and then HRCI changed their mind after the session was over and our attendees were stuck with general credits, despite paying an extra fee for a business-credit session. Madness, right?

I finally came away with this conclusion: if you want to get business credits, you have to attend a session that has 0% HR content. Take a marketing class. Go to a statistics program. Just don’t do anything that mentions HR in the title or the session abstract and you’re fine. Continue reading


HR Technology Vendor Demos: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly [Podcast]

One of the aspects of my job that I love is helping HR leaders select the right technology for their firms. (Thinking about changing technology this year? Let’s talk.)

How many vendor demos have you been through lately? Could the demo have been run more smoothly? Were there any issues? Do you have pet peeves about how vendor demos should run?

If the group of HR leaders we examined has anything to say about it, there is a clear need for improvement in how these demos are managed. From showing up without contextual understanding of the business or the industry challenges to selling software features that don’t yet exist, there’s room for improvement. In the podcast episode below, industry expert George LaRocque and I explore these and other issues plaguing the vendor demo scene.

Subscribers, click through to listen in to the discussion.

Show Notes

Show link:

Demos! Within the sales process, HR technology vendors often put more effort on prospecting and phone conversations than on the demos themselves. That’s why more than a dozen people recently weighed in on how vendors could improve their demo skills and delivery in one online forum dedicated to HR and talent technology. From demoing without context to discussing ROI and value, there was no shortage of issues and complaints about how technology demos are often run with HR software providers.

george-larocqueIn today’s conversation, I speak with George LaRocque, founder of HRWINS and co-moderator of Talent Product Plays, a Facebook group targeting users, sellers, and analysts in the talent technology space. We walk through some of the top ways that vendors can improve their demos as well as some key lessons for buyers and HR practitioners on how to evaluate and select their technologies. This time of year many companies are re-evaluating their approach to HR technology, and this conversation could influence how your own organization either succeeds or fails at finding the right software to enable your business to succeed.

  • To learn more about George, please check out
  • The Facebook group can be found here:

Interested in checking out additional episodes of We’re Only Human? Visit our podcast page to learn more about the show, our mission, and what we’re all about.

phr shrm-cp hr certification

Which HR Certification is Better? An Analysis of the SHRM-CP and PHR

Last week I received an interesting question that echoed what I’ve seen from dozens of people around the new year:

I came across this discussion while trying to formulate an argument supporting the value and credibility of the SHRM-CP credential.

I have years years of HR experience and about five years ago, I started looking at HRCI and the PHR certification. Eventually, I hit the experience AND degree requirements to take the PHR, but decided to go with the certification offered by SHRM, thinking that a credential offered directly by the society would hold equal if not more weight.

My immediate supervisor is PHR credentialed. When I announced that I had earned my SHRM-CP credential, the response was underwhelming and I was left with the impression that they are not convinced that it is on par with the PHR credential.

We are in the process of updating a Professional Development policy for our company and I’d really like to be able to present an argument for recognizing the SHRM-CP as equivalent to the PHR. I’ve done a bit of looking online, but have yet to see anything that clearly compares the two credentials.

Over the last few years, the piece I wrote about the PHR vs the SHRM-CP certifications has been seen hundreds of thousands of times. I’ve had dozens of comments and questions from people, and over time my thoughts have changed a bit and have become more clear. Plus, some of the actions of the certifying bodies themselves are changing how I view the world. First, let’s address the question at hand.  Continue reading

sleep wellness

The Biggest Sleep Study in History Uncovered this Chilling Fact About Us

Recently I caught a story on Yahoo Finance about the analysis of more than six billion nights of sleep data released from FitBit. We all think about sleep in almost abstract terms–I sleep or I don’t, I’m sleepy or I’m not, etc. But this has a real, tangible effect on how we operate as humans and how we perform at work, at home, and elsewhere. For instance, women get an average of six hours and fifty minutes of sleep per night, but men get six hours and twenty six minutes of sleep, both of them more than 13% less than the recommended eight hour a night target.

While it might be hard to adjust that overall number due to work, life, and family responsibilities (I have four kids under the age of eight, just sayin’!) one thing we can work on is bedtime consistency.

Here’s a snippet from the article:

Bedtime consistency

The biggest finding in Fitbit’s data may be the link between sleep quality and bedtime consistency.

That, Gleichauf explains, “is this idea that your bedtime varies.”

And in America, it really does vary — by an average of 64 minutes. You might go to bed at 11 p.m. on weeknights, but stay up after midnight on the weekends.

The Fitbit data shows that your sleep suffers as a result. If your bedtime varies by two hours over the week, you’ll average half hour of sleep a night less than someone whose bedtime varies by only 30 minutes.

And you’ll pay the price.

By the time your weekly bedtime variation is 2 hours, it’s costing you half an hour of sleep a night.

You know how jet lag works, right? “When you have jet lag, it’s the mismatch between the actual time, in the zone you’re in, and your circadian rhythm,” Gleichauf told me. “You’re not on the right part of that curve to make you fall asleep.” So, at night in your new city, you lie there for hours, unable to fall asleep — and then in the middle of the next day, you’re overcome by exhaustion.

When your bedtime varies over the week, then, you’re creating self-induced jet lag. Gleichauf calls it social jet lag: On Monday, when you have to go back to work (and drag your bedtime backward), you feel crummy and you’re more likely to get sick.

(Dr. Till Roenneberg, professor at the Institute of Medical Psychology at the University of Munich, calculates that every hour of social jetlag increases your risk of being overweight or obese by about 33%.)

“I’m super excited about this data,” Heneghan says. “For the first time ever, we were actually able to show the link between consistency and how long you sleep.” Source

Continue reading

joe deloss

Can a Business Grow Competitively While Doing Social Good? [Podcast]

The United States is experiencing one of the lowest unemployment rates in history, and a new study from Express Employment Professionals shows that 8 in 10 businesses expect to grow this year. Where will that talent come from, since artificial intelligence isn’t here yet to save us?

joe delossFor most employers, this means that retention is going to be more important this year than ever before, and this is especially true for employers where turnover in customer-facing roles leads to critical gaps in coverage, performance, and service. We need to be asking ourselves how we can treat the people we hire in such a way that we actually improve their lives. It’s about more than just offering them a paycheck in so many ways.

In the interview below, I speak with Joe DeLoss, Head Fryer and Founder at Hot Chicken Takeover. The question I asked in the title (can a business be competitive while doing social good?) is clearly answered in this interview as we talk about his mission and vision for the company in the context of the social impact it has.

Subscribers, click through to listen to the interview.

Show Notes

Episode link: Listen on the We’re Only Human Podcast page

Customers come first. Time is money. Tie it to the bottom line.

In each of these instances, we think we’re serving the business. But what if we thought first with our heart instead of our head–could we still serve the business just as well? In this interview with Joe DeLoss, Head Fryer and Founder of Hot Chicken Takeover, we will deeply challenge your thinking on that concept.

In this episode, I talk with Joe about the company’s rapid growth, unorthodox hiring strategies, and what happens when you bend from your principles during times of high-pressure growth (hint: not a good idea). Additionally, they discuss tailoring employee benefits to meet the needs of the workers instead of offering a template plan like the competition. Through it all, you’ll hear Joe’s focus is not just on marketing strategy or chicken recipes, but on the employees he serves as the leader of the business.

For more information about Joe and HCT, check out the links below:

To see all the show archives and learn more about We’re Only Human, please visit